BEWICK'S WREN


Thryomanes bewickii


Description:

Named by Audubon after Thomas Bewick (1753-1828), an English naturalist and engraver. Like other wrens, this bird often holds its tail in an upright (cocked) position. It uses its long, thin bill to search in the foliage and bark of trees and shrubs and around garden plants for insects of all kinds. Pesticides and loss of habitat have caused the decline of this bird on the east coast. In fact, very few are still found east of the Mississippi.


Appearance:

Gray-brown upperparts. Grayish-white underparts. Prominent white eyebrow. Wings and tail have black barring. Long, thin, dark, slightly downward curved bill. Long, rounded tail with white corners. Black legs. Sexes similiar. 4.5 to 5.5 inches in length.


Habitat:

Thickets and open woodlands (broadleaf and riparian up to 10,000).


Nesting:

5-7 white eggs with brown spots and a 12-14 day incubation period. Fledging occurs 14 days after hatching. The nest is a cavity filled with sticks, leaves, grass, and feathers. The cavity can be located anywhere, including woodpeck holes, tin cans, or a coat pocket!


Observed Locations:

  • Lake Murray, La Mesa
  • Kitchen Creek Road, Mount Laguna





Click on an image to see the larger version.

details

details

details

details

details

 

 


Home | References
Copyright © Scott Streit, 2000.