NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW


Stelgidopteryx serripennis


Description:

The Northern Rough-Winged Swallow receives its name from the "roughness" of its primary feathers. These birds are rarely seen out of flight. In fact, these birds do not do well on the ground and are usually only seen there while gathering nest materials. Also, they will actually fly in order to move just a few feet across the ground. This Swallow mostly feeds over water and eats flying insects such as flies, winged ants, wasps, and beetles. To drink, they dip their bill into the water while flying. Flies low to the ground and can navigate tight turns. Has a slower, smoother wingbeat as compared to the "fluttery" wingbeat of the Bank Swallow.


Appearance:

Warm brown upperparts, dusky throat and breast, and white underparts. Small bill. Forked tail. Sexes similiar. Is larger and lacks the breast band that the Bank Swallow has. 4 to 5 inches in length.


Habitat:

Open water (lakes) and woodlands.


Nesting:

4-8 white eggs incubated by the female for 15-17 days. Fledging occurs 19-21 days after hatching. Nests in ready-made crevices and burrows near open water.


Observed Locations:

  • Lake Murray, La Mesa
  • Santee Lakes, Santee


  Listen To This Bird ( mp3 )
         Song #1 | Song #2




Click on an image to see the larger version.

details

details

details

details

details

details

details

 

 


Home | References
Copyright © Scott Streit, 2000.