ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER


Vermivora celata


Description:

Its noticeable lack of markings is what make it identifiable and different from other warblers. The orange crown patch is only visible during mating or when the bird is alarmed. The scientific name celata means "to conclea in", which refers to the birds orange crown.


Appearance:

Grayish-olive or olive-green head, back and wings. Yellowish underparts. Very faint breast streaks. Thin, pointed black bill. Indistinct broken eye ring. Orange crown patch, which is rarely seen. No wing bars. Sexes similar, but females and immatures are somewhat duller in color. 4-5 inches in length.


Habitat:

Broadleaf woodlands, thickets, brushy fields, parks.


Nesting:

4-6 white eggs with reddish or lavender spots, often concentrated at the larger end. The eggs have a 12-14 day incubation period. Fledging occurs in 8-10 days. The nest is a large cup made from grass and other plant material, and is lined with fur or feathers. The nest is built on or near the ground.


Observed Locations:

  • Lake Murray, La Mesa
  • Mission Trails Regional Park, San Diego
  • FRNC, Point Loma
  • "The Drip", Cabrillo National Monument, Point Loma
  • Wild Animal Park, Escondido


  Listen To This Bird ( mp3 )
         Song #1




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