TREE SWALLOW


Tachycineta bicolor


Description:

Swallows are most often found in groups and can be seen flying and swooping around in an erratic motion as they feed on flying insects. The Tree Swallows are usually the first of its kind you see flying around in early Spring. They are also the only Swallow species to feed on berries when insects are not available. While nesting, the male will defend an area approximately 15 m around the nest from not only other swallows, but also from other tree hole nesting bird species.


Appearance:

Irridescent blue-green upperparts and wings, white underparts. Tiny bill. Forked tail. Slender, pointy wings. Female duller in color. Sexes similiar. 5 inches in length.


Habitat:

Anywhere there's flying insects. Lakes, ponds, and open fields.


Nesting:

4-6 white eggs with a 15 day incubation period. Fledging occurs 16-24 days after hatching. The nest is an open cup made from grass and lined with feathers. Traditionally these birds nest in tree holes near water, but birdhouses have increased their nesting possibilities.


Observed Locations:

  • Santee Lakes, Santee
  • Mission Trails Regional Park





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