YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER


Dendroica coronata


Description:

This bird, formerly known as the "Audubon's Warbler", is very abundant in our area during the winter months. No wonder it's the most widespread and best known of all the warblers. They can often be seen in small groups as they gather berries from the trees. They nest in Canada, where they lay 4-5 eggs that incubate in about 13 days.


Appearance:

General: 5 to 6 inches in length.

Male has dull blue upperparts with a white belly and yellow crown, throat, rump, and breast side patches. White wing patch. Male has less intense colors during non-breeding season.

Female is a duller gray with less intense yellow. Both have broken eye ring.


Habitat:

Woodlands, open fields, and coniferous forests.


Nesting:

4-5 white eggs with brown spots and blotches. The incubation period is around 13 days. Fledging occurs 10-12 days after hatching. The nest is a bulky open cup made from twigs, sticks, rootlets, and grass, lined with feathers and hair. The nest is usually built in a coniferous tree.


Observed Locations:

  • Lake Murray, La Mesa
  • Santee Lakes, Santee
  • FRNC, Point Loma
  • Crown Point, Mission Bay
  • Through much of the county during winter





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